Multiple studies conducted in the United States, Canada, Germany, and the United Kingdom show that the probability of dying in the hospital is higher if you are admitted on the weekend. Why might this be? What factors might contribute to this probability?

 

References:

European Society of Anaesthesiology (2014, May 31). Risk of death highest following surgery in afternoons, at weekends, and in February. EurekAlert! Retrieved from http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-05/eso-rod052914.php

Webster Crowley, R., Yeoh, H. K., Stukenborg, G. J., Medel, R., Kassell, N. F., & Dumont, A. S. (2009). Influence of weekend hospital admission on short-term mortality after intracerebral hemorrhage. Stroke. Advance online publication. doi:10.1161/STROKEAHA.108.546572

Redelmeier, D. A., & Bell, C. M. (2007). Weekend worriers. New England Journal of Medicine, 356(11), 1164–1165. Retrieved fromhttp://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMe068310

Augenstein, S. (2011). “Weekend effect” a problem in understaffed hospitals, study finds. NJ.com. Retrieved from

http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2011/06/weekend_effect_a_problem_in_un.html

Campbell, D. (2013, May 29). Risk of death from surgery greater at the weekend, study finds. The Guardian. Retrieved fromhttp://www.theguardian.com/society/2013/may/28/death-risk-higher-nhs-fridays

Campbell, D. (2012, February 2). Hospital patients more at risk at weekends. The Guardian. Retrieved fromhttp://www.theguardian.com/society/2012/feb/03/hospital-patients-risk-weekends

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